10 powerful questions to scan someone to uncover their hidden cache of cashable assets.

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If you want to be successful and reach your leadership potential, you need to embrace asking questions as a lifestyle. Make it a habit to ask questions, instead of giving answer. Be the dumbest person in the room, instead of the smartest person in the room.

Asking the right questions of the right person at the right time is a powerful combination.
“The ability to ask the right question is more than half the battle of finding the answer.” – Thomas J. Watson
Following are 10 powerful questions to ask anyone, especially people you care deeply about.

Uncover from the Mind:

  1. Knowledge: what do you know? (knowledge, schooling)
  2. Skills: what can you do? (skills, know-how, street-smarts)
  3. Confidence: where have you been successful? (money, relationship, organization)
  4. Failures and fears: what have you failed at/feared?
  5. What are your three biggest problems/challenges?

Uncover from the Heart:

  1. Passion: What are your passions? 
  2. Desire: What are your desires?
  3. Talents: What are you good at?
  4. Wisdom: What are your life’s top three lessons?
  5. Connections: Whom do you know?

 

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About the author: Hoan Do is a certified leadership coach. Hoan have led multiple teams at Symantec Inc. across the globe delivering world-class solutions to protect consumers and businesses. Hoan is an expert in building highly performing teams. He believes that the best leader is the leader that could grow his followers to be leaders. Hoan has been organizing mastermind groups to share with other leaders about transformational leadership and coaching. He has trained many leaders via mastermind groups, workshops, and one-on-one coaching.

If you are curious about the above method and how you can apply it to your life successfully, open your email and send me an inquiry at coach@hoanmdo.com

Life and Leadership Lessons learned from Bill Campbell – the ultimate coach of Billionaire CEOs including Steve Jobs, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Sergey Brin

Bill was described as a legendary coach who coached Steve Jobs, Eric Schmitz, Larry Page, Sergey Brins.

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I first read about Bill Campbell from “Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal” by Nick Bilton. Bill was brought into Twitter to mentor the CEO Evan Williams.

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Bill was described as a legendary coach who coached Steve Jobs, Eric Schmitz, Larry Page, Sergey Brins. From the first meeting, Bill fearlessly pointed out to Evan that the biggest mistake a CEO can make is to “Hire your fucking friends.” Bill often sat on Twitter’s board meeting.

Later I read about Bill Campbell in The Amazon Way.

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Bill was brought into Amazon by the board to help deal with Amazon’s leadership crisis. Amazon employees were complaining about Jeff Bezos’ controlling and demanding styles. The board was considering whether to ask Jeff Bezos to step aside and let someone else be the CEO. “Campbell had a reputation for being an astute listener who could parachute into difficult corporate situations and get executives to confront their own shortcomings. Steve Jobs considered him a confidant and got him to join the Apple board when Jobs returned to the helm of that company in 1997.

After meeting Jeff Bezos, Bill concluded that “Why would you ever replace him [Jeff Bezos]?’ He’s out of his mind, so brilliant about what he does.

I read about Bill Campbell from Ben Horowitz’s book: The Hard Things about Hard Things.

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Ben described Bill as “At the time, Bill was in his sixties, with gray hair and a gruff voice, yet he had the energy of a twenty-year-old….Bill is extremely smart, super-charismatic, and elite operationally, but the key to his success goes beyond those attributes. In any situation—whether it’s the board of Apple, where he’s served for over a decade; the Columbia University Board of Trustees, where he is chairman; or the girls’ football team that he coaches—Bill is inevitably everybody’s favorite person…..
No matter who you are, you need two kinds of friends in your life. The first kind is one you can call when something good happens, and you need someone who will be excited for you. Not a fake excitement veiling envy, but a real excitement. You need someone who will actually be more excited for you than he would be if it had happened to him. The second kind of friend is somebody you can call when things go horribly wrong—when your life is on the line and you only have one phone call. Who is it going to be? Bill Campbell is both of those friends.

Several valuable advices Bill Campbell gave Ben Horowitz:

  1. In preparing to fire an executive: “Ben, you cannot let him keep his job, but you absolutely can let him keep his respect.
  2. When announcing a layoff: “The message is for the people who are staying.

The most noticeable journey of Bill Campbell was his journey as GO corporation’s CEO. GO was the startup on pen computers in late 80s. GO raised more venture capital than most other startups and lost it all. However, “The amazing thing was that every one of those GO employees counted GO as one of the greatest work experiences of their lives. The best work experience ever despite the fact that their careers stood still, they made no money, and they were front-page failures. GO was a good place to work.

Jerry Kaplan, GO’s founder, described Bill Campbell in his book “The Startup” as “he was passionate about whatever he was doing, and he placed the welfare of his employees above all else, including his own.

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Jerry learned from Bill that the key skill is not in convincing people of your point of view with rational arguments, but, when circumstances require, in building a feeling of consensus in the face of uncertainty or adversity.
Bill worked only face to face or on the phone.
Bill’s trademark was to give people who wandered by his office a big bear hug.
For a man pushing fifty, Bill was in remarkable mental and physical shape. He worked out for an hour every morning before coming to the office while he read the trades, newspapers, and analysts’ reports.
He took great delight in his ability to outlast whomever he was traveling with, staying out late with customers and getting up early for pre-breakfast briefings.
Wherever we went, Bill seemed to know everyone, and everyone considered him a personal friend.
He’d sit with individual executives and ask them about their families, and tell a story or two in his colloquial way, and gradually he’d learn how they felt about the issue at hand. He had a remarkable way of getting people to agree in advance before they came into the room.
For Bill, it was always about the team, the company. He was devoid of private motives or agendas. The mission was paramount. Bill was a master leader who developed great leaders.
Among many lessons, Bill taught us the importance of a team’s dignity, especially when a company fails.

 

In his latest book “Measure What Matters”, John Doerr dedicated one chapter to Bill Campbell and Larry Page wrote the rare foreword because of Bill Campbell.

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John Doerr described Bill’s role as “Kleiner invests, Doerr sponsors, Doerr calls Campbell, Campbell coaches the team. We ran that game plan again and again.

He coached in his characteristic style, one part Zen and one part Bud Light. Bill gave little direction. He’d ask a very few questions, invariably the right ones. But mostly he listened. He knew that most times in business there were several right answers, and the leader’s job was to pick one. “Just make a decision,” he’d say. Or: “Are you moving forward? Are you breaking ties? Let’s keep rolling.

People are discouraged from bringing love into business settings, but love was Bill’s most distinguishing trait.
Sometimes it was love by faux insult. (If you came to work in an ugly sweater, he’d ask, “Did you roll some guy in the restroom to get that thing?”) But you always knew the Coach cared. You always knew he had your back. You always knew he was there for the team. You don’t find many leaders who can convey love and fearless feedback at the same time. Bill Campbell was a tough coach, but he was always a players’ coach.
And you’d never find the Coach distractedly checking his cell phone in the sixth inning. He was completely present. He sparkled in that setting.
Bill’s moto: Get better everyday.

From Forbes article: What are some of the key fundamentals you do when you go to work for a company?

Campbell: First of all, I don’t really take the company unless the founder is passionate and really wants to create something durable. Once you get the founder and CEO, you just want to find out what makes them tick. You’re trying to understand what they want to get out of their management team. Then you try to spend time with the team. And then put processes in place. I’m not going to tell Larry Page and Sergey Brin how to do their search algorithms. I just try to bring what they’re doing to life.

More articles about Bill Campbell:

  1. http://fortune.com/2016/07/13/leadership-lessons-from-ceo-coach-bill-campbell/
  2. https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthof/2011/07/27/startups-secrets-of-bill-campbell-the-coach-of-silicon-valley/#5d73d0546931
  3. http://fortune.com/2008/07/01/bill-campbell/

Books:

  1. The Hard Things about Hard Things – Ben Horowitz
  2. Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal – Nick Bilton
  3. The Hard Things about Hard Things – Ben Horowitz
  4. The Startup – Jerry Kaplan
  5. Measure What Matters – John Doerr
  6. Playbook: The Coach – Lessons Learned from Bill Campbell – Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg, Alan Eagle

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About the author: Hoan Do is a certified leadership coach with John Maxwell Team. Hoan have led multiple teams at Symantec Inc. across the globe delivering world-class solutions to protect consumers and businesses. Hoan is an expert in building highly performing teams. He believes that the best leader is the leader that could grow his followers to be leaders. Hoan has been organizing mastermind groups at work to share with other leaders about transformational leadership and coaching. He has trained many leaders both inside and outside Symantec via mastermind groups, workshops, and one-on-one coaching.
Coaching inquiry can be sent to coach@hoanmdo.com

How to get your dream job with no experience – Lessons from Bill McDermott

Bill McDermott is the CEO of SAP, the world’s largest business software company. He worked at Xerox for 17 years climbing its corporate ladder from an entry-level salesman to the corporate officer and division president. Bill then went to become the president at Gartner. Bill joined SAP as its CEO for North America in 2002. He again climbed the SAP’s corporate ladder to become SAP’s CEO.

How Bill got the jobs he wanted is a valuable lesson. It demonstrates a key principle: if you really want it and are willing to ask for it, you will get it.

1982 Bill’s first job at Xerox when he was 21 and just got out of college ( he didn’t go to any prestige school):

Bill went to the interview at Xerox’s office in New York. He wore a $99 suit (an expensive suit at that time) as he believed in overdressing and showing his professionalism.

When he said goodbye to his dad, he told his dad: “I just want you to know I’m coming home with my employee badge in my pocket. I guarantee it….Dad, I love you. I am coming home with a badge in my pocket.”

Bill realized that his chance of getting into Xerox was very slim. He was competing against people who went to Yale, Princeton, Notre Dame,…

Instead of panicking, Bill connected with other interviewees to learn as much about them as he could. He asked about where they came from, what schools they went to, what they were at Xerox for…. In other words, he was interviewing his competitors.

Bill completed several rounds of interviews and was ushered into a senior sales executive’s office for the final interview.

Instead of being nervous, Bill remembered his mom’s words and took them to heart: Just be yourself.

When the interview with the executive completed and Bill was told that he would hear back from Xerox after they reviewed all interviews, Bill did not want to wait. He knew exactly what he wanted: a job at Xerox.

He told the executive: “I told my father as I left him at the train station today, that I guaranteed I would come home tonight with my employee badge in my pocket. In twenty-one years, I’ve never broken a promise to my dad, and I can’t start now.” He then looked the executive into the eyes with silence. He knew that all he could do was to ask for what he wanted.

Bill got the job on spot. He did not leave immediately but closed the offer: “I do want to confirm that you’re going to hire me at the Xerox Corporation and I’m going to work for this company, yes? You’ve given me the job, is that right?”

Bill’s first sales manager job at Xerox:

After securing the support from the man in charge of Xerox’s New York operation, Bill applied to become a sales manager.  Bill was the least experienced, youngest candidate.

Bill arrived at the interview dressing above his present grade. While in the waiting room, he interviewed his competition. He asked about why they wanted the job, what their plan would be if they got the job…. Once he’s done, he knew that he had an edge: he wanted the job more than anyone else and he was prepared more than anyone else in the room.

Bill then interviewed with an executive who had the hiring authority. He showed her his plan in writing and told her what he would do as a sales manager.

Then he closed the interview after the executive told him to wait for HR to communicate the final decision: “You know that I can sell. And I know that I can get everyone on the team to sell. Give me this chance, and I will make this team number one in the country. I guarantee it. Number one.”

“Well, Bill, that is very different from everyone else.” She was smiling. “I appreciate everything you’ve done today.”

“I respect you, and therefore I don’t want to ask you tedious questions. I only want to ask you one more: Will you give me your trust and give me a shot at doing this job?” Bill asked.

“Bill, there’s a process we have to go through . . .”

“My trust is in your hands, and I believe the right thing will happen. I’ll be in the office early tomorrow if you’d like to talk some more.” Bill concluded.

Bill got the job. Once again, Bill asked for what he wanted and got it.

 

 

 

If you really want a job, ask for it. Go straight to the decision maker and ask for it with all your passion and energy. Be sure that it’s your dream job.

Learn another skill to ASK for what you want: “This simple skill is worth millions, helped many become millionaires, billionaires

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Other popular articles:

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  9. Making 6 figures #2? How to avoid being one of 29% of American households with no retirement savings

About the author: Hoan Do is a certified leadership coach. Hoan have led multiple teams at Symantec Inc. across the globe delivering world-class solutions to protect consumers and businesses. Hoan is an expert in building highly performing teams. He believes that the best leader is the leader that could grow his followers to be leaders. Hoan has been organizing mastermind groups to share with other leaders about transformational leadership and coaching. He has trained many leaders via mastermind groups, workshops, and one-on-one coaching.

PS: if this article inspires you, don’t wait. Take action immediately. If you want to talk, contact me by sending me an email to hoandojmx@gmail.com . To get a response, be sure to tell me your dream.

PSS: Read Bill McDermott’s memoirs: Winners Dream

 

The biggest mistake you might make: assign power, influence, authority to someone with a title

Engineer 1 visits the headquarter office and meets a VP at the elevator. The engineer doesn’t know that this is a VP.

Engineer in a very peaceful and pleasant voice: “Hi, how are you? My name is X. I am visiting from another office. This is my first time here. You must be very lucky to work in this nice office.”

VP: “Thank you. Yes, it’s a nice office. What team are you in?”

Engineer: “I am on team Y.”

VP: “It is a great team. You guys are working on some cool project.”

The elevator comes to a stop and they wish each other well.

Later on, when the engineer find out that he talked to a VP, he hopes that he didn’t say anything stupid.

At the end of the day, the engineer takes the elevator to go home and meets the VP again.

Knowing that he’s in the same elevator with a VP, the engineer becomes very uncomfortable. The VP is friendly like he was in the morning and is glad to see his new friend again. Fear grows inside the engineer. He’s intimidated. He just says “Hi” and couldn’t open his mouth anymore.

It’s the same person this engineer meets in two different circumstances. The engineer lets the title and formal position intimidate him. He’s no longer free like he was in the morning.

This is a common mistake people in workplace make. They assign power and authority to someone’s title. They let titles control how they talk to someone.

A title doesn’t make someone a leader. A position doesn’t make someone a leader. What make someone a leader is influence. Influence is earned. Don’t assign power, influence, authority to someone with a title. More importantly, treat everyone you meet like a human being.

Leaders are readers

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When Warren Buffett was once asked about the key to success, he pointed to a stack of nearby books and said, “Read 500 pages like this every day. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest. All of you can do it, but I guarantee not many of you will do it.”

Buffett devotes 80% of his day to read between 600 and 1000 pages per day.

Bill Gates reads about one book a week, which is about 50 books per year.

Mark Cuban reads more than 3 hours per day.

Elon Musk, when asked how he built rockets, said that he reads books. Musk read 2 books a day, 10 hours a day, and had a book in his hand all the time when he was just a young boy. He buried himself into all the bookstore and library wherever he went.

Mark Zuckerburg read a book every two weeks in 2015.

Warren Bennis, a pioneer of leadership studies, said that one of the marvelous things about life is that any gaps in your education can be filled, whatever your age or situation, by reading, and thinking about what you read.

Books to read if you want to get rich in 2018 (source: CNBC):

  1. Think and grow rich by Napoleon Hill
  2. Business Adventure by John Brooks
  3. Your money or your life by Vicki Robin, Joe Dominguez, and Monique Tilford
  4. Unshakable by Tony Robbins
  5. The little book of common sense investing by John C. Bogle

Here are some of the books billionaires read:

  1. “Business Adventures” by John Brooks
  2. “String Theory” by David Foster Wallace
  3. “Shoe Dog” by Phil Knight
  4. “The Myth of the Strong Leader” by Archie Brown
  5. “The Grid” by Gretchen Bakke
  6. “A Full Life” by Jimmy Carter
  7. “Born a Crime” by Trevor Noah
  8. “Portfolios of the Poor” by Daryl Collins
  9. “Creativity, Inc.” by Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace
  10. “The Idea Factory” by Jon Gertner
  11. “Dealing with China” by Henry M. Paulson
  12. “The Remains of the Day” by Kazuo Ishiguro
  13. “Built to Last” by Jim Collins and Jerry I. Porras
  14. “Creation” by Steve Grand
  15. “Good to Great” by Jim Collins
  16. “The Innovator’s Dilemma” by Clayton Christensen
  17. “Sam Walton: Made in America” by Sam Walton
  18. “Lean Thinking” by James Womanck and Daniel Jones
  19. “Memos from the Chairman” by Alan Greenberg
  20. “The Mythical Man-Month” by Frederick P. Brooks Jr.
  21. “The Goal” by Eliyahu Goldratt, Jeff Cox and David Whitford
  22. “Data-Driven Marketing” by Mark Jeffery
  23. “Structures” by J.E. Gordon
  24. “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life” by Walter Isaacson
  25. “Einstein: His Life and Universe” by Walter Isaacson
  26. “Superintelligence” by Nick Bostrom
  27. “Merchants of Doubt” by Erik M. Conway and Naomi Oreskes
  28. “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding
  29. “Zero to One” by Peter Thiel and Blake Masters
  30. The “Foundation” trilogy by Isaac Asimov
  31. “Why Nations Fail” by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson
  32. “The Rational Optimist” by Matt Ridley
  33. “Now, Discover Your Strengths” by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton
  34. “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway
  35. “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman
  36. “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  37. “The Four Agreements” by Miguel Ruiz
  38. “The Checklist Manifesto” by Atul Gawande
  39. “The Score Takes Care of Itself” by Bill Walsh, Steve Jamison and Craig Walsh
  40. “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell
  41. “Crush It!” by Gary Vaynerchuk
  42. “Peak” by Chip Conley
  43. “The $100 Startup” by Chris Guillebeau
  44. “The Charisma Myth” by Olivia Fox Cabane
  45. “The Design of Everyday Things” by Don Norman
  46. “The American Challenge” by Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber
  47. “The Great Illusion” by Norman Angell
  48. “The Right Stuff” by Tom Wolfe
  49. “Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World” by Rene Girard, Stephen Bann and Michael Metteer

Books that teach you how to be rich:

  1. “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill
  2. “The Intelligent Investor” by Benjamin Graham
  3. “Your Money or Your Life” by Vicki Robin, Joe Dominguez, and Monique Tilford
  4. “How Rich People Think” by Steve Siebold
  5. “The Richest Man in Babylon” by George S. Clason
  6. “The Automatic Millionaire” by David Bach
  7. “Rich Dad Poor Dad” by Robert Kiyosaki
  8. “The Little Book of Common Sense Investing” by John C. Bogle
  9. “Rich Habits” by Thomas Corley
  10. “Born Rich” by Bob Proctor

And my favorite list, which Warren Buffett recommended in his annual letters:

  1. The Intelligent Investor, by Benjamin Graham
  2. Security Analysis, by Benjamin Graham and David L. Dodd
  3. Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits, by Philip Fisher
  4. Stress Test: Reflections on Financial Crises, by Tim Geithner
  5. The Essays of Warren Buffett, by Warren Buffett
  6. Jack: Straight from the Gut, by Jack Welch
  7. The Outsiders, by William Thorndike Jr.
  8. The Clash of the Cultures, by John Bogle
  9. Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales From the World of Wall Street, by John Brooks
  10. Where Are the Customers’ Yachts? by Fred Schwed
  11. Essays in Persuasion, by John Maynard Keynes
  12. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing, by Jack Bogle
  13. Poor Charlie’s Almanack, edited by Peter Kaufman
  14. The Most Important Thing Illuminated, by Howard Marks
  15. Dream Big, by Cristiane Correa
  16. First a Dream, by Jim Clayton and Bill Retherford
  17. Take on the Street, by Arthur Levitt

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Other popular articles:

  1. 20 minutes that can change your life
  2. How to get your dream job with no experience – Lessons from Bill McDermott
  3. Leaders are readers
  4. A SPECIAL GIFT FOR YOU – WHY SHOULD I HIRE A COACH?
  5. Life lessons from a Uber driver who was laid off
  6. How to guard yourself against negative influences
  7. This simple skill is worth millions, helped many become millionaires, billionaires
  8. Making 6 figures? How to avoid being one of 69% of Americans who have less than $1000 in the bank.
  9. Making 6 figures #2? How to avoid being one of 29% of American households with no retirement savings

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